stevemedcroft.com
1Dec/180

Decluttering your smartphone

I love technology. I always have. My first cell phone was a Motorolo 8000, the infamous 'brick' phone, large as a masonry block and just as heavy. My first personal computer the IBM AT 8800, replete with a green screen and floppy disks. I am old enough to see the evolution of most of the technology that we take for granted today, and some that used to seem futuristic; smartphones, personal computers, drones, robots, self-driving cars, etc.

Technology has improved our productivity and enhanced out lives. So many formerly analog tasks and media have been replaced by technology. But, along with all that productivity have come distractions. Apps designed to entertain us, to make us more productive, to encourage us to play and consume, gobble up an overwhelming amount of time. We are caught in a loop of self-perpetuating, addictive usage.

Like many of us, my biggest time-sucking technological device is the smartphone. Never more than an arms length away from me (even when sleeping), this powerful, candy-bar sized computer is a constant source of distraction and mindless consumption. I both love it and feel like I could not live life without it. We constantly check to see if there is a new email, text, or instant message for us to respond to. We fiddle with Facebook to get a dose of what-did-I-miss in a group of other people's lives. We scroll for fifteen minutes on Instagram at pretty images promoting other people's vision for their life. Twitter. Oh, God. Since Donald J. Trump became president, I would hover on Twitter in a constant state of anxiety expecting to read at any moment that society had collapsed. I log in to the websites of CNN and NPR and ABC News and NBC News and the New York Times and Fox News, not really sure what I'm hoping to read, but rattled nonetheless. Oh, I also YouTube and stream Hulu, Netflix, and Amazon Prime on my phone. I'm stressed out just writing down the list of all the ways I use the smartphone mindlessly.

These uses of technology make us consumers, products of someone else's business, rather than a self-directed individuals using amazing new technology to empower our own lives. I hate myself for the addictive powerlessness I feel sometimes when I throw my precious life away on this device.

How can we get control our toxic use of technology? Should we get rid of our phones? Switch to a model with a limited display, one that only makes phone calls and maybe, if we're lucky, text messages? That's not really practical, right? Technology is not the problem. Our use of it is the problem. The manipulation of us as users by the manufacturer's and app developers is the problem. So we don't need to remove personal technology from our lives. We just need to minimize it.

Decluttering the smart phone

At its core, the smartphone is a computer that runs applications. Each application serves a specific function. Some are powerful computing tools, like email, which allow me to connect with people on my terms. Some are powerful personal tools; my banking app that allows me to oversee and manage my business and personal finances. Some are powerful information and entertainment tools; my Kindle reader that gives me access to all my reading material. Regaining control over the smartphone and turning it back into a tool for productivity is about curating apps and organizing the way you interact with device.

First, this means setting up the options on the phone to take away the things developers use to encourage overuse, like notifications, sounds, and available times. It then means sorting applications into three categories; keep, throw away, and consider.

The 'keep' applications are those that are essential to your everyday life, that lead to productivity, are valuable, and bring you joy. The calculator function is an example of this. I use it regularly and having access to a calculator on my phone means I don't have to possess a physical calculator. Same with the phone function itself. I wouldn't want to not be able to make and take phone calls. You want your keep applications readily accessible.

The throw-away applications are apps we never use and don't need. These could be apps installed by default with the device, apps we install to get access to a certain service, games we never play, or apps installed to support memberships and rewards points programs we can access another way. Get rid of of any app that you do not use (remember, if you get rid of anything in your life you later find essential, you can always bring it back).

Consider remaining applications carefully. They maybe important to you, but lead you to consumptive behavior. Email, Social-media apps, video apps, etc. The might properly belong in the remove pile, but we each have to make our own decisions on these. For me, getting rid of Twitter, Instagram and Facebook as apps was a step (I've even gone so far to delete my Twitter account). Keep the apps you want access to, but use the phone's settings to minimize their intrusion into your daily life in several key ways.

Only keep essentials on the home screen of your smartphone.

Only keep essentials on the home screen of your smartphone.

First, you can remove all notifications. Much of my smartphone use was triggered by the applications reaching out to me. I was getting a digital tap on the shoulder in the form of a ping or a pop-up or an icon on my home screen. My response to the tap was always to pick up my phone. I'd always check. Human Beings are wired to need certainty. Open a question in our minds and we are programmed to need to know the answer. It's a primal, base-level survival response. App developers know this and use it to manipulate us to use their apps. Removing notifications gets you back in control of one way the technology uses us rather than the other way around.

I also set my phone to automatically go into Do-Not-Disturb mode for specific hours every day. At 5pm, until 9am the next morning, only a programmed list of people important to me can reach me by phone or text. This small change put a giant border around my use of technology that gives me control of how the tool is used.

Another trick to get control over smartphone use is to minimize your phone screens. We decide where app icons appear on our phone, and we are able to have multiple screens. Put the essential apps, the ones you want quick access to, that don't lead to overconsumption or abuse your time, on the home screen. Bury other apps behind the home screen to add a layer layer of friction between the impulse to use the app (check email open Instagram) and the actual use of the app. This friction, the need to scroll to a second or third screen or first open a folder to gain access to an app, gives you a moment to challenge the impulse. I want to manage how often I check email, so I buried email in my phone. To get to my email app, I literally have to open my phone, scroll to the right four times, open a folder, scroll to the second page of icons, then click the email icon. That's enough effort that I question whether or not I really want to do this every time.

With my smartphone notifications silenced, do-not-disturb limiting access to me to working hours, and a screen layout that gets me quick access to the apps that I find essential, and adds friction to get to the apps I abuse, I feel like I am at peace with this technology now. How about you? Do you recognize the pervasiveness of this technology in your life? Do you feel out of balance, like you're giving too much time and energy to your smartphone that you want to redirect to more positive uses? How are you decluttering or minimizing your smartphone use?

The step-by-step to a decluttered smartphone:

  1. Scroll through your phone. Look at everything you've installed there. Create a list with three columns; keep, consider, and throw-away.
  2. Keep - list the essential apps. What do you need and use on a daily basis. Calendar? Calculator? Kindle Reader app? Phone, Text? Music, Podcast? These apps will stay, but the device will be setup to make them passive and readily accessible.
  3. Consider - decide which apps you use, but are habit-forming or you overuse mindlessly. For me, that's email and browsing the web. Those apps will stay, but will be silenced and placed behind a layer or two of friction.
  4. Throw-away - remove everything else that you can.
  5. Setup your screens. Home screen for need. Second screen with a folder full of the none-essentials. Maybe one screen per app (to force scrolling to find the one you typically use by habit and add friction).
  6. Setup a Do Not Disturb time.
  7. Establish your favorites (who will be able to penetrate the DND time).
  8. Turn off all notifications. All. Notifications. Except maybe the badges so long as they are not on the home screen. No push notifications.
  9. Charge your phone somewhere other than beside your bed.
  10. Leave your phone in your car when you go to the store or to a movie or to visit someone.
15Nov/180

The home-builder’s approach to writing

In order to lay out a project plan detailing how to write long-form fiction and non-fiction in less than nine months, we are wise to take lessons from the home-construction industry.

Writing a novel (or a non-fiction book) is a big job. The first draft of projects that are anywhere from 50,000 to 100,000 words and more can take months, even years. It takes even longer to refine that draft into a publishable manuscript. In order to make it to the end of such a big task, it's important to have a plan that spells out the journey from idea to finished product.

The challenge in writing longer works is how easy it is to lose momentum. Short-form writing is so much easier to complete. Knocking out a 1,500-word article is a single creative task. The first version can go down in one sitting. The re-write and polish done in a session or two.

In long projects, the work stretches out over a very long timeline. It's common to start off with excellent momentum as you plow headlong into the first draft. I can turn out 1,000 words or more a day in no time when I am hot on a new idea. In theory then, a first draft should take me two to three months. Re-writes and revisions take less time per go-through, so I should be able to pop off a couple of book-length projects a year, right? But, and I think is common to many long-form writers, my current work-in-progress has languished for almost two years due to breaks in momentum (overwhelmed by other work, reach a sticky plot point and have to step out of the flow of writing to solve it), for example.

Picking back up after long delays is unhealthy for a book (or its author). You have to re-insert yourself into the flow of the story, re-pack the various story and character threads in your active, writing brain (the one that sits under your conscious mind and works at the story's problems while you're driving, showering, or doing anything else but writing).

Knowing this is going to happen though, it's important to be prepared for it, to have a plan in place.

What writers can learn from the construction industry

My family and I live in a semi-rural suburban community in the greater Phoenix area. Nestled in an older neighborhood with 300 two-acre horse properties, we had been surrounded by mostly farm fields and open desert since we moved in. But lately, progress has marched our direction in the form of fast-turnaround, tract-home housing neighborhoods.

It's amazing to see these projects at work. Modern home construction, from outside observation, is a remarkably efficient human enterprise. Land is cleared in a matter of days. Wooden frames appear almost overnights. Within a month or two, the first finished model homes are open for sale.

If you've ever had exposure to construction management, you'll know that the efficiencies come from the following of a system that is much like the system it takes to create full-length fiction and non-fiction.

Construction projects are broken down into their elemental parts, working backwards from the finished product. You can't move furniture into a new house until every detail in the interior is finished. The interior can't be finished until the flooring and walls are in place. The walls and flooring can't be finished until the electrical and plumbing and HVAC systems are installed. They can't go into place until the frame is in place. Which can only be erected on a solid foundation. Which has to sit on land that is properly prepared.

This is an over simplification, but you get the point. Efficiency in construction is about managing those layered efforts, bringing in the right crews to construct the right layers in the right order. And within each layer, making sure that materials, plans, and everything else the crew needs to get their piece done as quickly and correctly as possible is in place.

The primary took constriction project managers use is the Gantt chart. Ever seen one? It looks like a color-coded spreadsheet. The timeline of the project runs across the headers. The project elements (the jobs that have to be done) and listed in the columns (in the order they have to happen).

From WikipediaA Gantt chart is a type of bar chart that illustrates a project schedule, named after its inventor, Henry Gantt (1861–1919), who designed such a chart around the years 1910–1915. Modern Gantt charts also show the dependency relationships between activities and current schedule status.

Build your next novel like contractors build a house

Writers can learn a great deal from construction. Have a plan. Break the bigger job into a series of smaller tasks that are needed. Set intermediate deadlines to keep the momentum going.

The exact steps and the timeline goals are for you to work out. For me (since this is a letter to myself), writing a novel breaks down to the following steps/timelines:

  • Story idea and initial outline - two weeks. Not everyone is a planner when it comes to writing fiction. Some people have the amazing ability to just write their way through a first draft. I need a plan. It starts with a two-week budget for outlining the next book-length project. I start with the basics of the story - the main characters, the settings, the major story line. Then I break that into thirds (setup, climax, the middle bit). Then I plot out the scenes (about 100 total). I then write paragraph or two-length beats of the action in the scenes as a guide to follow when writing.
  • First draft - 12 weeks. How fast this goes depends on how many words per day and how many days per week you can give it. I'm good for 1,500-2,500 words a day (when I have an outline to follow). I can write 5-6 days most weeks (work and life depending). Which means, a 100-scene first draft of about 80,000 words should take me less than 90-days to complete. The goal here is to get the first draft out in one creative push. The better you're able to hold momentum during the first-draft, the more likely you are to finish.
  • Re-write (1) - six weeks. In my experience, it takes about half as much time to read through, mark-up, and execute changes to a first draft to get a complete second draft. I make lots of notes of things I wants to fix, change, and improve, and only make the edits after I've read through and marked up the entire story. I print my manuscript for this edit because I find it's easier to read/edit on paper than on screen.
  • Re-write (2) - four weeks. You might need only two or three revisions. You might need more. The point here is to predict the phases of production you need to complete your book and stay focused on one intermediate goal at a time.  At some point, you'll have your best draft, something you can pass on to a few readers for feedback.
  • Final draft - two weeks. Taking my final notes, and notes from the reader(s), you should be able to produce a best draft. Only then is it time for professional editing. Paying a professional editor to critique and revise your manuscript can be expensive, so you want to make sure I have my best-possible draft ready.
  • Editor - four weeks. I plan to write another article about the different types of editors available (there are several), but if you're serious about producing professional work, you need professional guidance. Editors work on contract and you have to book your window with them in advance. If you did not plan this deadline to deliver your final draft to an editor in advance, your project could grind to a halt when your story goes to the editor. Book your editor as soon as you know you're going to have a first draft, a couple of months before you'd be ready to submit.
  • Cover, copy, marketing - the same four weeks. While your manuscript is with an editor, take the time to get your marketing materials and cover done. I'l write more about this in another post, but there are numerous freelancers available to hire for cover creation. The book will also need blurbs for the back of the cover, copy for the listing pages, or your website . The book will need a dedication page, acknowledgements, references (if non-fiction), newsletter subscription page, a list of your other works, etc. Get all these things done while your edit is underway. Schedule them here so you don't slow your writing down earlier in the book obsessing about things that don't matter until. And, if you're publishing through a traditional route, this is the time to dial in your query, synopsis, and cover letter.
  • Copy edit - two weeks. Whether you use a third party of do this yourself, someone needs to go through every sentence of the book carefully and find the last stinking remnants of misspellings, double words, missing punctuation, before you dare say the book is ready. Try reading your book aloud to spot imperfections. Read each paragraph in reverse order, from the back of the book to the front of the book. Find whatever trick and tip you can to make sure you leave no mistakes in the manuscript before publishing.
  • Publish and promote. Whether you publish independently through the various mediums available, or pursue traditional publishing, stop fiddling with the book and switch your brain into selling mode. Then immediately start your next project.

Completing a book-length project (for me) is, in theory, a thirty-six to forty-week project. Somehow, I've managed to stretch the current work-in-progress to out over two years by allowing my momentum to break in the middle of this workflow! To finish, I need build out this novel-production plan (Gantt chart) once more, identify where in the process I am with the current work, and re-insert myself into the production flow.

How about you? Do you have a production plan that you follow for writing your long-form work (fiction or non-fiction)? How different is it from this? What am I missing that you include? What do I include that is helpful to you?

29Mar/180

I am big, fat liar (the lazy writer)

I am not working hard enough on my dream

My current Work In Progress is a novella called The Singer. It's about a guy named Thatcher Graves who is the lead of a tribute band to a famous (fictional) group called The Light. The Light's lead singer and founder, Rock, disappeared under mysterious circumstances years before. Thatcher hires a run-down drifter (Gordy) who has a gift for playing Rock and The Light's music as a new lead singer. Over a week or so of getting to know the secretive Gordy, Thatcher becomes convinced he is actually Rock for real.

I have written a few drafts now and just made a major revision (over the last few weeks, I have read a printed copy of the manuscript and marked it up with changes and have just entered all those changes into the novel document in Scrivener). It's the best version I can create prior to it going out for its professional critique, or to be seen by Beta readers.

To finish entering the edits, I set a weekly goal of  typing in half the edits per week for two weeks. Every time I sat down to work on it, I kept track in my daily writing spreadsheet. The first week, I managed 139 pages (and procrastinated so I didn't really start until Thursday) so I felt good about myself. Then I reviewed the spreadsheet.

Looking back at the analysis of the time I spent working on my revisions, I came to the painful realization that rather than making remarkable progress on this project, I had managed to take a one or two-day project and stretch it out over four lazy weeks!

Here I was, felling good about myself, making progress on my production plan and thinking I am being professional about my writing but the whole time, was lying to myself about what progress means. Simply put, I was being lazy. My goal was not aggressive enough.

Am I the world's laziest writer?

The chart of my work for the week is pictured above. I am stunned by how little actual time I worked on my goal.

Don't get me wrong, I am a busy guy (working in two businesses, I have a family, fitness goals, and so on), but I had many, many opportunity to work on this editing. I didn't chart them but I bet I spent double or even triple this many hours watching television the same week. I slept in a couple of days. I read a book that week I know browsed Twitter and the news and obsessed over a million things in the world a hundred times for a few minutes each. I have no one to blame for not putting the time into my novel than me.

I'm disappointed in myself. The goal that I broke down into a two-week project, when I look at the actual work involved, could have taken place in two days. One if I was ambitious! Seriously, what am I waiting for?

My legacy goal is to master the art of storytelling in the novel format. To get there, I need to keep writing novels, keep putting them out these for readers to react to, and keep taking that feedback and learning and growing for the next project. I have set a big goal for myself to publish 20 novels in the next 20 years. It seemed ambitious at the time. And I really, really, really want to succeed at this. But now 20 novels in 20 years is starting to feel like a lazy goal. Maybe it should be double? Or the timeline shortened?

The questions to ask about your Big Hairy Audacious Goal

Will I change anything based on this revelation? I think so. I'm starting with questions. I've written them below (in case they help you in your goal-setting). And when I have the answers, I'll share them to.

Do you have a lifetime goal for your writing? Are you on track to reach it? Do you have a clear picture of what success looks like? And are you honest with yourself on whether or not you're doing the work it takes to get there?

21Mar/180

How to write a novel in 30-minute increments

Ambition is the root of all creation

It's important to have ambitions as a novelist. Having a clear vision for what you want to accomplish can go a long way to guiding you through the many opportunities you have to give up on the dream. Ambitions is helpful to guide your choices and provide the kick in the pants we all need to stay on track. And your ambition should be big.

So what are yours? Are they financial (financial freedom or getting rich)? Are they metric-based (a million books sold, listed on top of the New York Times Beset-seller list)? Are they merit-based (television or movie franchise made from your books)? Are they legacy-based (change the world with your work)?

Think about your big-picture goal. Create as real a picture as you possibly can about that ultimate place you want to reach with your lifetime of work. How would it feel to be at the end of your life looking back knowing you had accomplished what you set out to accomplish? How would you be living? Where will you be living? What does a bookshelf of your work look like?

My current ambition is to publish twenty novels in the next twenty years. I want to master the form to the best of my ability. I want own the self-identity of novelist. I want to write novels that entertain and inform and maybe even influence people to reflect on what it is to be human, to strive and reach for the greatest version of themselves (because that is what I am trying to do with my life). Success looks to me like respect from other writers, an audience who is affected by my work, and a life that ultimately requires no other sources of income to allow me to explore my creative self.

Momentum is the energy you need to harness to create

Using that lifetime achievement ambition as a flag planted in the ground to guide me, the big question I work on constantly is how can I find the time to create my novels when I have a busy life (work, family, travel, other obligations)? How does a person with creative ambition manage the competition for time to create and the need (want) to provide for my family and myself and live a standard, enjoyable, everyday American life.

I concede that I could drop everything in favor of my writing goal. Put everything else second. let my professional life suffer, spend less, live frugally, and one and on. Damn the consequences. Go all in and muster the pure will to mount the hill of my ambition. I could do that. But I would not be happy. People I love, people I chose to bring into my life (family, business partners, employees), would suffer and I feel it would be a selfish choice to abandon my role in their lives strictly for my own. In fact, not only can I not discard them all in pursuit of my ambition, I will not let my focus shift from what I need to do to make that part of my world work. I believe I can have both.

With focus, clear goals, and discipline, I believe I can create good novels in the space between the more real parts of my life. I can achieve my ambitions. I wouldn't be the first person to do it either. The world is littered with examples of people who achieved creative success starting from within the boundaries of a "normal" life. And the potential to be an example for someone else who is looking to do the same is exciting to me. That's real legacy.

The 30-minute novel

The challenge is more about focus and time management than whether or not it is possible to achieve my goal. I can write a book (create, write, edit, publish) in the space of year with only the fringes of time available. If I'm smart and if I'm ready to deal with the inevitable losses of momentum that will happen, I can make it. It's all in the doing.

I am a planner. I set goals. I create a strategy. I build a tactical plan. I organize my working life around accomplishing the tasks that need to be done every day to move me toward my goals. My approach to writing is no exception. I sometimes need to sit down and plot out a strategy to get a project done. I think best by writing so I wrote out the things I do to get my work done when I have limited time. The plan looks like this:

  1. Give something up. For me, television was the biggest culprit. I calculated how much time I watched television ion the evening and did some math and decided to swap that time for writing time. Not a direct swap (because I write better mid-morning). But free that time so everything I need to get accomplished can get accomplished and I also now have 2-4 hours a day that I can use towards my writing without sacrificing the things that are important to me (work, family, exercise, fun).
  2. Focus on productivity. Become an expert of focus, being able to turn on and turn off your creativity at will (it takes practice but can be mastered). Learn about and test out different methods for organizing your working day. I use the pomodoro method. It works for me. And I am a consumer of content of productivity and organization so I'm always looking for a new technique to try. What works for you?
  3. All you need is 30 minutes. With focus and a little preparation, you can accomplish real progress in a short amount of time. This is probably advice better suited to planners versus pantsers (writers who write their stories without much outlining and pre-planning, flowing organically with their creative process), but decide ahead of time what you need to work on next so when you sit down with a limited time window, you can jump right into the work.
  4. Start early and end late. It may not be fun to set the alarm clock 30-minutes early or sit down with my writing just as I was about to go to bed, but those fringes of time, when coupled with planning and a little focused energy, can produce significant advancement of the work-in-progress.
  5. Use your breaks. At my day job, I am not always great about taking a lunch break. I usually work straight through. But when I need to kick up some momentum on a writing project, lunch breaks become the perfect time to knock out a bit of work. When I'm really ambitious about putting in daily time on my current work-in-progress, I may even schedule in a mid-afternoon meeting for 30-minutes and use it to work on my story. These writing breaks make a great relief from the pace and responsibility of my day job and actually help me be more productive.
  6. Stop on the way home. When I need to get in a little extra time to work on a project, another trick I use to keep the work going is to stop somewhere on my way home from work. A coffee shop or a library usually. I plan ahead what I'm going to do with that time (beats, printed editable pages, marked-up page edits to enter), the knock out an hour or productivity before settling in at home for the night.
  7. Track your work. I created a spreadsheet to keep track of the work I do during every one of these mini sessions. When I'm writing drafts, I track word counts. When I'm editing, I count pages. I come up with a score for each session (word or pages-per hour). Keeping score lets me game myself to stay in track and accomplish my micro-goals. Because I'm working with limited buckets of time, being honest with myself about what I accomplish is important to being true to my ambition.

If you're not as much a planner as me, you may read the above and feel like I have managed to suck the magic out of writing (Where is the fun in sex if it's scheduled from noon to 12:45pm every second Tuesday?). Don't worry. There is just as much story magic in a disciplined and organized approach as there is in the free-form (panther) method. I still finish a work session and look back at the work I did and wonder where did it come from. I still feel flow when I write. I just have to organize my life so when its time to create, I can drop into flow immediately.

Again, this is what works for me. What about you? What is your big ambition (don't be afraid for it to be monumentally big)? What is your work process? How are you most productive? And what do you do when you get off the rails?

18Mar/180

Loving the Pomodoro

On the search for better use of my time

For anyone who knows Italian, I am not talking about loving tomatoes (pomodoro is the Italian word for tomato). I do not love tomatoes. The opposite in fact. I think tomatoes are a slimy, foul-tasting cosmic error. They are like a collection of pepper seeds trapped in snot balled up inside rotten animal intestines.

And we are supposed to accept the tomato as a member of the fruit family? What kind of nonsense is the science of plant biology trying to foist on us there? Fruit is God's dessert, nature's vehicle for the the delivery of sugar, healthy food that gives the most pleasure. Does any of that describe a tomato?

A tomato needs to be transformed into something else to be palatable. And transformed in such a way as to hide its true nature. Think ketchup. Salsa. Pizza Sauce.

No, the pomodoro I have fallen in love with is definitely not the (air quotes) fruit (end air quotes), it is the pomodoro method of time management and work focus.

If you already know and use it, then there is no need to read this post. Really, just click off and go do something else. If you don't know it (or need a reminder of how frickin' awesome it is), stick around. It's about to get organized up in here.

You don't cook eggs using this timer

In Italy, a cooking timer (commonly called an egg time in England and the U.S.) is shaped like a tomato. The pomodoro timer has, usually and by tradition, a twenty-five minute maximum countdown.

As a writer, I struggle often with momentum and focus. I work on a project for a while then it bogs down or I get distracted. I also travel for work and can occasionally be sidelined by the demands of my two main sources of income when they overwhelm my days.

I am most productive when I work at least a little every day on my current writing project and lose momentum quickly when I miss even one or two days in a row. Breaking writing momentum strains my spirit and my belief in my place in the world as a writer. Picking the work back up takes days, even weeks sometimes.

Back to the pomodoro method. How do you work? Marathon work sessions? Are you a multitasker? A procrastinator? Marathon sessions lead to fatigue after even just two or three hours for most people. Multi-tasking might as well be called multi-failing because divided focus leads to no progress on more than front at the same time.

Italian efficiency expert Francesco Cirillo studied people's ability to create productive work and concluded that on average, we work best in short, focused bursts of attention on one thing at a time. We also benefit from breaks. And are capable of repeating that cycle for long work periods.

Getting your tomato on

The pomodoro method takes his lessons about focus and work/output and turns them into a simple systems. Which is this:

Start a timer for 25 minutes. Work on one focused thing (or type of thing) without stopping until the timer expires. No distractions. No responding to phone notifications. No breaks. Just 25 minutes of one-hundred-percent focus on one thing. Then take a five-minute break. Then repeat.

It's like magic for focus and getting shit done. When I use the pomodoro method, even if I can only go two or three deep in one day due to time constraints, I always make significant, measurable progress on whatever I chose to work on.

I use the pomodoro method when I work on my fiction. For first-draft writing, editing, typing in edits, proof-reading, story creation, etc. It works well for me. In 25 minutes, I can write 700 words or so. When I'm working on a new draft, my goal is to get three or four pomodoros in a day. That's usually around 2,000 words. Which makes writing a full-length first-draft novel an eight or ten week project tops. On the weekends, I can do as many as 8 and really not miss much of the day (that's only four hours of focused work).

Throwing tomatoes at things other than writing

I've even adopted the pomodoro method into my day job(s). When I have a pile of tasks or a particular goal for work, I just schedule in a block of time and use pomodoro's to focus my energy. It is an amazing system for regulating focus and helps me come out of the low-momentum periods that disrupt my writing ambitions.

I encourage you to learn about the pomodoro method. Try it yourself. Adapt the time periods to works for you. And share your thoughts. And if you use some other method for getting your work done when there isn't the luxury of unlimited work time, tell me about your system instead.